Tag Archives: Web 2.0

Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy

The NSW Institute of Teachers’ Professional Teaching Standards includes:

Element 4; Aspect 4.1.2 Demonstrate a range of questioning techniques designed to support student learning.

In observing my teacher, it is evident that teachers spend a significant amount of time asking questions and responding to answers. Research confirms that teachers can ask up to several hundred questions each day.

Questions can be used in order to stimulate interest, summarise important points, promote discussion, inspire higher cognitive level thinking, monitor class progress, routines and behaviours, uphold attention and assess learning.

Evidently, good questions are very important and require planning.

When we provide our students with higher order questions, they are required to think beyond simply remembering; reaching higher order levels and developing their thought processes. Different types of questions involve the use of different thinking skills.

My observations confirm that this is not an easy task as higher level questions are not being used often, if at all, in my current classroom.

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a multi-tiered chart which classifies thinking according to six cognitive levels of complexity. As teachers, we can use these levels, which can be seen in the butterfly poster below, to support our students to reach a higher level of thought.

Two of the most difficult skills in teaching refer to effective questioning and responding to answers. When planning questions, it is important to ensure they match the main points that are to be developed. Questions which focus on insignificant facts that do not focus on the material that needs to be covered need to be avoided.

Questions can be divided into two broad categories: fact and higher cognitive. Fact questions derive from the first tier of Bloom’s Taxonomy, while the higher cognitive level questions derive from the other levels. Independent thinking is encouraged via the higher cognitive level questions, with the amount varying according to the level of taxonomy.

Take a look at this Storybird I made, which provides some examples of applying Bloom’s Taxonomy in your classroom (click on the image).

 

 

Click here to learn about using Storybird in your classroom.

Among fact and higher order questions, teachers ask procedural questions pertaining to the routines and procedures of the class. Research states that 60% of the questions asked by teachers are fact, only 20% are higher cognitive and 20% are procedural.

This definitely needs to change.

Our students need to be provided with more higher cognitive level questions if we want to foster independent thinking and support our students in reaching a higher level of thinking to support their learning.

References

Alford, G., Herbert, P. & Frangenheim, E. (2006). Bloom’s Taxonomy Overview. In Innovative Teacher’s Companion, (pp176-224). ITC Publications.

Ball, M. (n.d.). Developing Thinking Skills. Retrieved 18 April, 2011, from http://curriculum.na5.acrobat.com/thinkingskills

Barry, K. & King, L. (1998). Developing instructional skills. In Beginning Teaching and Beyond, (3rd ed.), (pp144-167). Social Science Press.

Forehand, M. (2005). Bloom’s taxonomy: Original and revised. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Retrieved 18 April, 2011, from http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/

New South Wales Institute of Teachers. (2006). Professional Teaching Standards. Retrieved 4 Februray, 2009 from http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/Main-Professional-Teaching-Standards.html

Storybird. (2011). Collaborate Storytelling. Retrieved 18, April, 2011, from http://storybird.com/

Suki Husain. (2009). Bloom’s Taxonomy Poster for Elementary Teachers. Retrieved 18 April, 2011, from, http://blog.learningtoday.com/blog/bid/22740/Bloom-s-Taxonomy-Poster-for-Elementary-Teachers

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Filed under Graduate Professional Experience 1, NSW Institute of Teachers’ Professional Teaching Standards, Web 2.0 Applications

Using Technology To Support Learning

The NSW Institute of Teachers’ Professional Teaching Standards includes:

 Element 4; Aspect 4.1.5 – Use a range of teaching strategies and resources including ICT and other technologies to foster interest and support learning.

Today, I observed a teacher revising fractions with the year six class as they had performed badly in their pre-test. She went over the test on the whiteboard while the students were at their desks. While the teacher had good intentions, she;

– Moved through the questions very quickly

– Did not give the students enough time to answer her questions

– Did not rub off the writing on the whiteboard once moved onto the next question

– Did not provide much praise to the students

– Did not allow the students to write anything in their books

– Did not allow the students to use concrete materials

– Did not use the interactive whiteboard

Unfortunately, it seemed that the majority of the students took very little, if anything, away from that math lesson.

We need to acknowledge that our students have changed radically. The educational system wasn’t designed to teach today’s students.

Today’s students represent the first generations to grow up with digital technology in the last decades of the 20th century. During their entire lives, they have been absorbed by computers, videogames, digital music players, video cameras, mobile phones and many other digital tools and toys of the digital age.

As educators, we need to be thinking about how best to teach our students of today. We need to invent new ways of teaching, but not necessarily from scratch. Adapting materials to the language of this generation has already been done successfully, in particular the creation of games which help teach the content, even the most serious.

I can only imagine how different that lesson could have been if the interactive whiteboard had been turned on. Instead of the students looking out the window, hoping not to be the one chosen to answer a confusing question next, they could have been excited, engaged, learning and participating in a visual and interactive math lesson.

The below YouTube video demonstrates how the interactive whiteboard can be used for a fraction lesson. Get creative and become inspired!

I have also created a Prezi, ‘Learning in the 21st Century and Beyond’ to further encourage educators to grow with the change of the 21st century.

 

 References

Leonard, L. (2010). Fractions – understanding using visuals [Video File]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQ6UGZ_p0U4

New South Wales Institute of Teachers. (2006). Professional Teaching Standards. Retrieved 4 Februray, 2009 from http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/Main-Professional-Teaching-Standards.html

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon. 9 (5).

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Filed under Graduate Professional Experience 1, NSW Institute of Teachers’ Professional Teaching Standards, Web 2.0 Applications

My First School Visit

“If you want to feel secure, do what you already know how to do. If you want to be a true professional and continue to grow…go to the cutting edge of your competence, which means a temporary loss of security. So whenever you don’t quite know what you’re doing, know that you are growing” – Madeline Hunter.

I decided to open with this quote because I found it in the opening pages of one of my book of readings and it has stuck with me ever since. In fact, it is now on my study wall providing me with motivation and reassurance.

My first, of six day a week visits, arrived without delay and that morning, I nervously made my way to my allocated school.

I found my way to my allocated year six classroom and was relieved beyond belief to be greeted with a welcoming teacher (yes!). She proudly showed me a box of posters, bottles, lanyards and stickers she ordered from a health organisation promoting drug and alcohol awareness, which we organised into groups for each class.

When the bell rang, the students poured inside. A smile spread across my face as soon as I saw their happy faces, and I knew it was going to be okay – that I could do this.

The teacher welcomed them and introduced me as a prac student who deserved the same amount of respect as all other teachers which was quite nice, however I wished she had let me say hello.

My first day was quiet as the students completed tests for the majority of the day. I was able to walk around and help those with their hands up.

The year six teachers have split up the subjects of health, HSIE and art, with my classroom teacher focussing on health. Today, the teacher displayed posters advertising the negative effects of drugs and alcohol. It was difficult for the students to see the detail in them from their desks. On reflection, to improve the lesson, the teacher could have divided the students into groups, each group having a different poster, and answer questions which could be presented to the class at the end of the lesson.

All in all, it was a good day and I left the school feeling positive.

The NSW Institute of Teachers’ Professional Teaching Standards includes:

Element 4; Aspect 4.1.5 – Use a range of teaching strategies and resources including ICT and other technologies to foster interest and support learning.

Wordle is a great engaging resource that can be used in your classroom. It is a fantastic word cloud generator that the students can use in many different ways for many different purposes. Click on the image for 51 ways to use Wordle in your classroom.

 

Today, I will leave you with my own Wordle, reflecting my thoughts and feelings about my first school visit.

References

Feinberg, J. (2009). Wordle. Retrived 4 February, 2011, from http://www.wordle.net/create

New South Wales Institute of Teachers. (2006). Professional Teaching Standards. Retrieved 4 Februray, 2009, from http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/Main-Professional-Teaching-Standards.html

Tanti, M. (2011). EDFD529 Effective Teaching and Professional Practice (Primary). Australian Catholic University Ltd

Warner, M. (n.d.) 51 Interesting Ways to Use Wordle in the Classroom. Retrieved March 30, 2011, from http://www.ideastoinspire.co.uk/wordle.htm

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Filed under Graduate Professional Experience 1, NSW Institute of Teachers’ Professional Teaching Standards, Web 2.0 Applications