Book Recommendation #1: How To Talk So Kids Can Learn

How To Talk So Kids Can LearnI am writing a series of blog posts recommending quality books that I have read in order to energise and inform my teaching practise. Hopefully, I will inspire you to do the same.

“In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you.” – Mortimer J Adler

“Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.” – Joseph Addison

How To Talk So Kids Can Learn by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish is a very practical and helpful book for all teachers. The Washington Post stated ‘if you’re a teacher or parent, you simply can’t get along without this book’ and I couldn’t agree more. Each chapter provided me with a simple yet valuable tool that I could use the very next day with my students. I found myself immediately applying what I had learnt to so many interactions with my students and I saw the benefits instantly.  I became more aware of what I was saying to my students and the impact it had on the students was astounding.

The book provides very specific scenarios that teachers experience on a daily basis with very detailed examples of appropriate responses teachers can use with their students in order to truly solve the problem. The book not only provides detailed reasons as to why these responses are so effective and beneficial, but practical questions and stories from parents and teachers. Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish discuss scenarios involving the following;

  • Feelings that interfere with learning
  • Inviting kids to cooperate
  • Punishment and self-discipline
  • Solving problems
  • Praise
  • Children and roles
  • Parent-teacher partnership

You can purchase the book here.

Join in on the discussion! Have you read this book?

Do you have other books you would like to recommend?

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Filed under Book Recommendation, Goals, Professional Development

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